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One improves by learning to be productively ashamed of who one currently is.

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(via kateoplis)

magicalnaturetour:

 Photo by Moro

"And I wondered, with mounting anxiety, What am I supposed to do here? What am I supposed to think?"
—Alain de Botton, The Art of Travel

magicalnaturetour:

Photo by Moro

"And I wondered, with mounting anxiety, What am I supposed to do here? What am I supposed to think?"

—Alain de Botton, The Art of Travel

(Source: moro.35photo.ru, via harvestheart)

wasbella102:

Uphill by David Cheifetz

"The architects who benefit us most maybe those generous enough to lay aside their claims to genius in order to devote themselves to assembling graceful but predominantly unoriginal boxes. Architecture should have the confidence and the kindness to be a little boring."
—Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness

wasbella102:

Uphill by David Cheifetz

"The architects who benefit us most maybe those generous enough to lay aside their claims to genius in order to devote themselves to assembling graceful but predominantly unoriginal boxes. Architecture should have the confidence and the kindness to be a little boring."

—Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness

(via harvestheart)

heyoscarwilde:

Gotham by artist John Van Fleet

"It is in dialogue with pain that many beautiful things acquire their value. Acquaintance with grief turns out to be one of the more unusual prerequisites of architectural appreciation. We might, quite aside from all other requirements, need to be a little sad before buildings can properly touch us."
—Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness

heyoscarwilde:

Gotham by artist John Van Fleet

"It is in dialogue with pain that many beautiful things acquire their value. Acquaintance with grief turns out to be one of the more unusual prerequisites of architectural appreciation. We might, quite aside from all other requirements, need to be a little sad before buildings can properly touch us."

—Alain de Botton, The Architecture of Happiness

(via bassman5911)

"That said, deciding to avoid other people does not necessarily equate with having no desire whatsoever for company; it may simply reflect a dissatisfaction with what—or who—is available. Cynics are, in the end, only idealists with awkwardly high standards. In Chamfort’s words, ‘It is sometimes said of a man who lives alone that he does not like society. This is like saying of a man that he does not like going for walks because he is not fond of walking at night in the forêt de Bondy.."
—Alain de Botton, Status Anxiety

"That said, deciding to avoid other people does not necessarily equate with having no desire whatsoever for company; it may simply reflect a dissatisfaction with what—or who—is available. Cynics are, in the end, only idealists with awkwardly high standards. In Chamfort’s words, ‘It is sometimes said of a man who lives alone that he does not like society. This is like saying of a man that he does not like going for walks because he is not fond of walking at night in the forêt de Bondy.."

—Alain de Botton, Status Anxiety

(Source: criminallyinnocent, via thecollectivecollage)

Why, then, if expensive things cannot bring us remarkable joy, are we so powerfully drawn to them?
—Alain de Botton | The Consolations of Philosophy

Why, then, if expensive things cannot bring us remarkable joy, are we so powerfully drawn to them?

—Alain de Botton | The Consolations of Philosophy

(Source: Flickr / enter_agony)

I wondered aloud to Renae why in our society the greatest sums of money tended to accrue from the sale of the least meaningful things, and why the dramatic improvements in efficiency and productivity at the heart of the Industrial Revolution so seldom extended beyond the provision of commonplace material goods. … I told Renae that our robots and engines were delivering the lion’s share of their benefits at the base of our pyramid of needs, that we were evident experts at swiftly assembling confectionery and yet we were still searching for reliable means of generating emotional stability or marital harmony.

- Alain de Botton | The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work

Though it may feel otherwise, enjoying life is no more dangerous than apprehending it with continuous anxiety and gloom.

- Alain de Botton

(Source: twitter.com)

If we find poetry in the service station and motel, if we are drawn to the airport or train carriage, it is perhaps because, in spite of their architectural compromises and discomforts, in spite of their garish colours and harsh lighting, we implicitly feel that these isolated places offer us a material setting for an alternative to the selfish ease, the habits and confinement of the ordinary, rooted world.
—Alain de Botton | The Art of Travel

If we find poetry in the service station and motel, if we are drawn to the airport or train carriage, it is perhaps because, in spite of their architectural compromises and discomforts, in spite of their garish colours and harsh lighting, we implicitly feel that these isolated places offer us a material setting for an alternative to the selfish ease, the habits and confinement of the ordinary, rooted world.

—Alain de Botton | The Art of Travel

At the end of hours of train-dreaming, we may feel we have been returned to ourselves.
—Alain de Botton | The Art of Travel

At the end of hours of train-dreaming, we may feel we have been returned to ourselves.

—Alain de Botton | The Art of Travel

Journeys are the midwives of thought. Few places are more conducive to internal conversations than moving planes, ships or trains.
—Alain de Botton | The Art of Travel

Journeys are the midwives of thought. Few places are more conducive to internal conversations than moving planes, ships or trains.

—Alain de Botton | The Art of Travel